Padova’s (Italy) Cycling Potential | streets.mn

IMG_7309-500x375There is reason to believe that Padova—a town with more than 200,000 people in the Veneto region in the north of Italy—is capable of becoming one of the country’s best cycling towns…

Here is the next entry in the EU BICI series including: Seville (Spain), BolognaFerrara (Italy), Berlin , Munich (Germany), Zurich (Switzerland), and Cambridge (U.K.).

VerDuS congress in Rotterdam

I was invited to participate in the VerDuS programme in Rotterdam (the Netherlands) on June 16-17, in which there were a variety of sessions focussing on:

  • Knowledge for Strong Cities
  • Sustainable Accessibility of the Randstad
  • Urban Regions in the Delta

Here are two photos from the event: one from my presentation and another in conversation with Luca Bertolini.

RvB-20140616-253RvB-20140616-327

Bologna’s Cycling Struggles and the Potential to Export its Intimacy

5 modes

The 2014 EU BICI series includes: Seville (Spain), Ferrara (Italy), Berlin , Munich (Germany), Zurich (Switzerland), and Cambridge (U.K.). And, now—my adopted home town for the past year: Bologna (Italy).

Cycling Tradition Dominates in Cambridge (UK) | streets.mn

IMG_7095The EU BICI moves to Cambridge (UK). Other posts available for  Seville (Spain), Ferrara (Italy), Berlin , Munich (Germany), and Zurich (Switzerland).

“There is one place in the United Kingdom that reports more than two times as much cycling relative to its closest competitor: Cambridge (~31% of all trips). Many consider this high-tech and bioscience oriented town of 123K people—also home to one of the most prestigious universities in the world—to be the haven for cycling in the U.K. It’s easy to rationalize such based on the cycling culture. The overall cycling infrastructure, however, is a different story.”

 

Cycling’s Stiff Competition in Zurich (Switzerland) | streets.mn

The 2014 EU BICI series recruits insights from Thomas Götschi (Zurich resident and past research collaborator) as a co-author for the post highlighting Switzerland’s largest city. Other cities available for Seville (Spain), Ferrara (Italy), Berlin and Munich (Germany). 

IMG_6840“The transport scene is Switzerland’s largest metropolitan area is admirable—almost two-thirds of trips are by non-auto[1]. A mere ~4% of these trips, however, are by bike. A logical deduction is that the cycling environment here suffers. However, it’s not this simple. The low cycling rates are best attributed to four factors: (1) almost 300km of public transport routes, including more than 100km of tram lines can whisk you most places in the city on 7.5 min headways[2], (2) walking is attractive as densities are suitable (average density is more than 4k per km2), (3) things are not flat, for the most part; Zurich is situated along the Limmat and Glatt valleys on the north tip of Lake Zurich, covering several hills, and (4) the current state of cycling affairs favors a limited market of the enthused and committed…”

Seminar at ETH Zurich

For those traipsing about in the old continent next week, I will be presenting at ETH Zurich on Tuesday (April 15):

Der Weg des Fahrradverkehrs ins zukünftige

Verkehrssystem

Dienstag, 15. April, 11:00-12:00

HIL F 36.1,

ETH Hönggerberg, Zürich

Prof. Kevin Krizek, University of Colorado, Boulder

“Paving Bicycling’s Path to Redemption in the Future of Transport Systems”

Bicycling Bonanza in Berlin (Germany) | streets.mn

IMG_6327The third part of the EU BICI is up at streets.mn focusing on Berlin. Prior posts are available for Seville (Spain) and Ferrara (Italy).

“Wide roads and dispersed development; a tradition rich in fast driving cars and a population cobbled from several cultures—these are not elements one associates with a city that generates 1.5 million cycling trips per day. But for Berlin, these ingredients have helped, in part, to catapult its success in recent years.”

Is Ferrara’s (Italy) bicycle success not IN the water but BECAUSE of it? | streets.mn

cartello 2-1Part 2 of the EU BICI is up, focusing on Ferrara (Italy). Part 1 was on Seville. 

“It’s hard to figure out how Ferrara (Italy) achieved legendary status among Europe’s top cycling towns. The answer might not be in the water; but it could be because of it. The ferraresi embrace the bike as much as any place I have seen. But in way lacking self-consciousness, most residents fail to consider themselves exceptional in this respect among neighboring cities.”

 

Professor, Environmental Design and Transport, University of Colorado